Did The Dup Support The Good Friday Agreement

The main problems that Sunningdale omitted and addressed in the Belfast Agreement are the principle of self-determination, the recognition of both national identities, Anglo-Irish intergovernmental cooperation and legal procedures to make power-sharing compulsory, such as inter-municipal voting and the D`Hondt system for appointing ministers for the executive. [24] [25] Tommy McKearney, a former IRA member and journalist, argues that the main difference is the British government`s intention to negotiate a comprehensive agreement by involving the IRA and the more intransigent unionists. [26] With regard to the right to self-determination, the jurist Austen Morgan cites two qualifications. Firstly, the transfer of territories from one State to another must be done through an international agreement between the British and Irish Governments. Secondly, the people of Northern Ireland can no longer bring a united Ireland alone; they need not only the Irish Government, but also the citizens of their neighbouring country, Ireland, to support unity. Morgan also pointed out that, unlike the Ireland Act 1949 and the Northern Ireland Constitution Act 1973, drawn up under Sunningdale, the 1998 Agreement and the resulting UK legislation explicitly provided for the possibility of a united Ireland. [27] As part of the agreement, it was proposed to build on the existing Anglo-Irish interparliamentary body. Prior to the agreement, the body was composed only of parliamentarians from the British and Irish parliaments. In 2001, as proposed in the agreement, it was extended to include parliamentarians from all members of the Anglo-Irish Council. Political parties in Northern Ireland, which endorsed the agreement, were also invited to consider the creation of an independent advisory forum, with members of civil society with social, cultural, economic and other expertise, and appointed by both administrations. In 2002, a framework for the North-South Consultation Forum was agreed, and in 2006 the Northern Ireland Executive agreed to support its establishment. On 23 June 1986, in protest against the agreement, DUP politicians occupied the Stormont parliament, while 200 supporters protested outside and clashed with the police. [36] The DUP politicians were violently removed by the police the next day.

[36] On July 10, Paisley and DUP Vice President Peter Robinson led 4,000 Loyalist supporters to a protest by “occupying” the city of Hillsborough. Hillsborough Castle is where the agreement was signed. [36] On August 7, Robinson led hundreds of loyalist partisans in an invasion of the village of Clontibret, Republic of Ireland. . . .